Tags: , , , , , , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 10/5/2016 2:20 PM | Comments (0)

The next two months are packed with tons of great technical events that I am really looking forward to.  Below are some of the events that I am involved with and will be attending between now and the end of November. I hope to run into you at these events.  If you see me, please don’t hesitate to say “hi”. I do love to talk tech.

Desert Code Camp – Phoenix AZ – October 8th 2016

Desert Code Camp makes its triumphant return from hiatus this weekend at Chandler-Gilbert Community College in the south-east valley.  I will be delivering my talk, “A Developer’s Guide to Finding Optimal Solutions” which is an introduction to combinatorial optimization designed specifically for software developers, at 9:45 am in room CHO-110.

IT/DevConnections – Las Vegas NV– October 10th-13th 2016

One of my favorite large conferences of the year is IT/DevConnections in Las Vegas.  This year marks my 4th attendance at this event, the 2nd as a speaker. I will be delivering the talk, “Dynamic Optimization – One Algorithm All Programmers Should Know”, a programmer’s introduction to Dynamic Programming, at 2:15 pm on October 13th in Brislecone 2 at the Aria Resort.

Atlanta Code Camp – Atlanta GA – October 15th 2016

This year marks my 2nd attendance at the Atlanta Code Camp.  My 1st experience there, last year when I presented on Dynamic Programming, was a big part of the inspiration for drilling deeper into the topic of combinatorial optimization. As such, I return to Atlanta this year with my new talk on the subject, “A Developer’s Guide to Finding Optimal Solutions”.

NWVDNUG & SEVDNUG – Phoenix AZ – Oct 26th and 27th

It is not yet confirmed as of this publication but I have a really great, internationally renown speaker lined-up for the Northwest Valley and Southeast Valley .NET User Groups this month.  Final arrangements are currently being made so keep an eye on meetup.com for each group for the details to be published as soon as they are finalized.

SoCalCodeCamp – Los Angeles CA, November 12th – 13th 2016

I have attended many instances of the Southern California Code camp, but this will only be my 2nd time at the Los Angeles incarnation of this event.  My 1st time there, last year, I was struck by the old-school beauty of the old school campus and facilities at USC when I presented my talk on Dynamic Programming.  This year, I will follow that up with my new, more general overview on the subject of finding optimal solutions.

NWVDNUG & SEVDNUG – Phoenix AZ – Nov 16th and 17th

Our good friend Jeremy Clark (blog, twitter) makes his annual tour of the Valley’s .NET User Groups to talk to us, once again, about many of the things you need to know about .NET and Software Engineering to make your development better. Jeremy will give a different talk each night so be sure to sign-up at the meetup sites and come to both meetings.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 8/10/2016 9:26 PM | Comments (0)

The organizing team of AZGiveCamp recently announced that we would be hosting a one-day Hackathon for Humanitarian Toolbox on Saturday, August 27th, from 8:30 am to 5pm at Ticketmaster in Scottsdale, AZ.  This event is a bit of a departure for us.  We have been looking for ways to evolve the organization to host more and different coding-for-charity events while continuing our mission to to help charitable and non-profit organizations in our community meet their technology needs.  We hope you’ll join us for this first experiment with other event types at AZGiveCamp.

AZGiveCamp’s flagship event is our Hackathon of Help. We have had the privilege of hosting 7 such events in the Valley of the Sun so far, with our 8th scheduled for March of 2017.  These events take up an entire weekend and are designed to put  multiple charity and non-profit organizations together with multiple development teams.  The teams are tasked with taking a project from idea to completion in the course of one weekend.  During these events, participants may chose to camp out at the event facility, stay up and work on their projects, or go home at night, returning to continue the project in the morning until the final turnover on Sunday afternoon.  These events are technology agnostic, with the specific technologies to be used determined by the teams themselves.

By contrast, the AZGiveCamp Humanitarian Toolbox Hackathon will be only a 1-day event.  Participants will work on a single project, the Humanitarian Toolbox (htBox) allReady project, for which the technologies, design, and many of the features have already been chosen and implemented.  We will be lending our support to this worthy organization by adding features, upgrading tooling, and writing tests against the existing code base.  This event will not be judged by how many projects we complete, but by how much better-off the project is when we are done.

For those not familiar with Humanitarian Toolbox, they are an organization that sets up projects to assist humanitarian organizations.  Their current project, dubbed allReady, is designed to organize the preparedness campaigns of the Red Cross and other disaster response groups.  The project is implemented in ASP.NET Core MVC with a Cordova client. Participants need to have at least a basic comfort level with one or both of these technologies, along with the appropriate development tools, to be an effective contributor to this project.  Specifics of the required tools can be found on the event page on Meetup.

We hope you’ll join us at this and future AZGiveCamp events.

Tags: , , , , , , , , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 10/21/2015 10:19 AM | Comments (0)

I hope you’ve had an opportunity to see my presentation, “Dynamic Optimization – One Technique all Programmers Should Know” at a Code Camp or User Group near you.  If so, and you want to have a copy of the slide deck for your very own, you can see it embedded below, or use the direct link to the Powerpoint here

The subject of this presentation is using a technique called Dynamic Programming to solve problems that have more than one possible solution.  This technique works very well when used to solve problems that are recursive in nature.  One of the best things about this technique is that it guarantees that the solution it produces is the best possible solution.

We look at three examples during the presentation, the first is done only “on paper” and is an example of using this technique to solve a knapsack problem.  The second example is done in pseudo-code and solves a linear best-path problem in the game of Chutes & Ladders.  Finally, we drop into Visual Studio to solve a 2-dimensional best-path problem.  Sample code for both of the last 2 examples can be found in GitHub.

Keep an eye on my Speaking Engagements Page for opportunities to see this presentation live. If you are a user group or conference organizer, you can contact me to schedule an in-person presentation.  This presentation is a lot of fun to deliver and has been received extremely well at Code Camps and User Groups across the country.

Tags: , , , , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 9/30/2015 10:23 AM | Comments (0)

I am really looking forward to October because I have 3 awesome events that I’ll be speaking, and learning, at:

  • The first event for the month  is Code Camp NYC in Manhattan on October 10th.  I have attending this event once before and loved it. I’m really looking forward to being there again.
  • Next up is Atlanta Code Camp on October 24th.  This will be my 1st time at this event, and my 1st time in Atlanta in many years.  Hopefully, people will have some helpful suggestions for what to see and do when I am not at the Code Camp.
  • Finally, I’ll be speaking at .NET Group – Southern Nevada’s .NET User Group in Las Vegas on October 29th.  I’ve spoken in Las Vegas at the Code Camp there before, but have never had the privilege of attending their user group.

I have several other event possibilities in the works for November and beyond. I’ll announce them here periodically, but you can always see my schedule, as well as past events and the talks I am currently giving, using the “Speaking Engagements” link above.

Tags: , , , , | Categories: Event, Development Posted by bsstahl on 6/28/2014 9:08 AM | Comments (0)

For those who saw my code camp presentation, “SOA – Beyond the Buzzwords”, you can find the slide deck here

There is much more to building a Service Oriented Architecture than just creating services. SOA services can be much more difficult to build, requiring more analysis and design work up-front than a non-service-enabled system or a system that relies on CRUD-style data services. In this session, we will look at real-world examples of SOAs, examining what a good SOA might look like, what conditions present a good opportunity to use a Service Oriented Architecture, and how we can make the process more agile. We will also look at some practical tips to help make your services more extensible and maintainable.

For those who haven’t yet seen this presentation, I will be giving this session at several other code camps and user groups around the US between now and the end of the year.  Keep an eye on my Speaking Engagements page or have your user group leader request me as a speaker via Ineta.

Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 2/6/2013 3:48 AM | Comments (0)

Here is an update on where and when I’ll be delivering presentations about software development in .NET over the next few months.  I still have some availability left for the H1 2013 and H2 is effectively wide open. You can request me as a speaker through INETA.

 

Sothern Most User Group in Key West FL on February 7th - “Code Portability in .NET”

South Florida Code Camp in Ft. Lauderdale FL on February 9th - “Building a DSL Using an OData Source”

Desert Code Camp on April 20th in Gilbert AZ – “Building a DSL Using an OData Source”

Twin Cities Code Camp in Minneapolis MN on April 27th – “Code Portability in .NET”

SELA Dev Conference in Tel-Aviv Israel on May 5-9 – a full day seminar version of “.NET TDD Kickstart” as well as “Code Portability in .NET”

CodeStock in Knoxville TN on July 12-13 “Code Portability in .NET” (assuming the attendees vote for my session) 

 

I hope to see you at one or more of these events.

I head out to Fullerton tomorrow for the start of my .NET TDD Kickstart world tour Smile

In this session, the speaker and the audience will "pair up" for a coding session which will serve as an introduction to Test Driven Development in an Agile environment. We will use C#, Visual Studio and Rhino Mocks to unit test code to be built both with and without dependencies. We will also highlight some of the common issues encountered during TDD and discuss strategies for overcoming them.

I will be presenting this session at numerous venues around the country this year, including, so far:

If you are interested in having me present this or another session at your event, please contact me.

There is much more than an hour’s worth of material to be presented, so instead of trying to rush through everything I want to talk about during this time, I’ve instead taken some questions from this presentation and posted them below.  Please contact me if you have any additional questions, need clarification, or if you have an suggestions or additions to these lists.

Update: I have moved the FAQ list here to allow it to be maintained separately from this post.

Tags: , , , , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 10/12/2011 8:29 AM | Comments (0)

It's AZGiveCamp time again! Our third event is coming up in under 2 weeks, Oct 21st-23rd 2011 at the Park Central Mall (Central Ave. between Thomas and Osborn) in midtown Phoenix. Please sign-up to volunteer as a developer, designer, or analyst at http://azgivecamp.org/Volunteer.aspx.

Special appeal: we need graphic designers! If you’re a pro or amateur, it doesn’t matter. Designers are always the most popular people at any GiveCamp!

Those who participated in the last 2 events already know that AZGiveCamp is the local component of a national event where the software development community comes together to support local charities and non-profits by developing or improving their web sites and applications. It's fun, it's agile, it's geeky, and it's good for the community.

We had a fantastic time at the last 2 events and, in Arizona alone, have helped more than 20 non-profits with their development needs. As someone who has now participated in GiveCamps as both a participant and as an organizer, I can honestly say the experience is very, very, worthwhile.

You can find out more about AZGiveCamp at http://azgivecamp.org and about the national organization at http://givecamp.org.

I am very excited about this event and look forward to working with all of you at AZGiveCamp III.

Tags: , , , , , | Categories: Development, Event Posted by bsstahl on 8/24/2011 2:14 PM | Comments (0)

http://www.pluralsight-training.net/microsoft/webcasts/index?utm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=VR

When I started at Arizona State University (ASU) about twenty-six years ago, I’d already been programming for five or six years, and building applications for a year or two. I’d done things like create hacking tools and WarGames dialers for my own use, and I’d built a few applications for businesses where I was doing lookups and filing information that was specific to that business, but all of that was very heavy on code and light on technique and reusability. I knew how to use variables and arrays, I knew how to make the computer do what I wanted it to do, but I didn’t know how to write good code. At ASU, there were two classes that I had take freshman year that were part of the Engineering & Applied Sciences core, that really woke me up to the world of Computer Science and the things that we, as engineers, can do with our code. Those classes were “Data Structures in Pascal” and “Discreet Mathematics”. These two classes are really the only classes where I have specific memories of the things I learned so long ago.

I remember, very clearly, in the data structures class, learning about linked-lists. I remember the realm of possibilities that I saw when introduced to this data structure. This really very simple data structure showed me tremendous power as a flexible, reusable foundational element, that dwarfed arrays and the other tools I knew at the time. Linked lists showed me how I could hold the same values as I held in an array with addition metadata that gave me the tools to access the values in a different way, in a way that made more sense for the use-case. I saw in these structures a tool I could use to build reusable frameworks that could operate on data in a way that was much more use-case specific. For example, I could use linked-lists to create a queue structure. Then, if the use-case dictated, I could extend that structure to hold a priority and make the queue priority based. These things, while possible just using flat arrays, were much more difficult and harder to reuse. Other structures like binary-trees had impact on me as well, but nothing like the fundamental power of the linked-list.

I remember, in the discreet math class, learning about algorithms that were, in effect, practical uses of math for programmers. Although that class was not officially geared towards programmers, it was very easy to see why it was a core requirement for the College of Engineering & Applied Sciences. I remember learning about various sorting algorithms and encryption methods, optimum path algorithms and best-fit criteria. Basically, I learned ways of applying mathematics to everyday problems I faced when writing code. As with the data structures class, my horizons were significantly expanded by this knowledge and I have used these tools, and my understanding of these tools, to some degree every day since.

For me, making the decision that I wanted to be a software engineer, as opposed to a hardware engineer, didn’t occur until after I started college. The two classes I have described, had a big impact on proving to me that my talent, and my passion, was for software and that programming was the path that I wanted to take in life.

Now, I see an opportunity, 26 years later, to refresh my memory and update my skills on some of these topics. There have been many changes in software engineering since my time in college. The .NET Framework now provides many of the foundational structures I use daily, and, with the help of generics, those structures will often work in a strongly-typed way on any data type I choose. These topics helped establish the course of my career and I am looking forward to seeing how the tools, and the use of these tools, has changed over time. While I realize that I cannot recreate the “eureka experience” of my original awakening, and that you cannot squeeze 2 full-semester classes into a 1-hour presentation, I am still very excited about attending the Pluralsight webcast on Algorithms and Data Structures tomorrow.

Tags: , | Categories: Event Posted by bsstahl on 6/28/2011 2:47 AM | Comments (0)

On a personal note, I’ve signed-up to play in the Reggie Sanders Foundation’s Wiffle Ball tournament which is part of the MLB All Star Weekend.  The event is being held at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on Saturday morning, July 9th at 9am.  On hand will be former MLB players and other celebrities and the event is to benefit the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center (SARRC).  If you are interested in playing, sponsoring, or attending, please contact John Zackery at (602) 421-3479 or by email at jzackery (at) gmail (dot) com.

Tournament Flier