Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Categories: Development Posted by bsstahl on 7/11/2014 8:53 PM | Comments (0)

I recently started working on a set of open-source projects for Code Camps and other community conferences with my friend Rob Richardson (@rob_rich). In addition to doing some good for the community, I expect these projects, which I will describe in more detail in upcoming posts, to allow me to experiment with several elements of software development that I have been looking forward to trying out. These include:

  • Using Git as a source control repository
  • Using nUnit within Visual Studio as a test runner
  • Solving an optimization problem in C#
  • Getting to work on a shared project with and learning from Rob

As an enterprise developer, I have been using MSTest and Team Foundation Server since they were released. My last experience with nUnit was probably about 10 years ago, and I have never used Git before. My source control experience prior to TFS was in VSS and CVS, and all of that was at least 6 or 7 years ago.

So far, I have to say I'm very pleased with both Git for source control, and nUnit for tests. Honestly, other than for the slight syntactical changes, I really can't tell that I'm using nUnit instead of MSTest. The integration with Visual Studio, once the appropriate extensions are added, is seamless. Using Git is a bit more of a change, but I am really liking the workflow it creates. I have found myself, somewhat automatically, committing my code to the local repository after each step of the Red-Green-Refactor TDD cycle, and then pushing all of those commits to the server after each full completion of that cycle. This is a good, natural workflow that gives the benefits of frequent commits, without breaking the build for other developers on the project. It also has the huge advantage of being basically unchanged in a disconnected environment like an airplane (though those are frequently not disconnected anymore).

The only possible downside I can see so far is the risk presented by the fact that code committed to the local repository, is not yet really safe. Committing code has historically been a way of protecting ourselves from disc crashes or other catastrophes. In this workflow, it is the push to the server, not the act of committing code, that gives us that redundancy protection. As long as we remember that we don't have this redundancy until we push, and make those pushes part of the requirements of our workflow, I think the benefits of frequent local commits greatly outweigh any additional risk.

As to the other two items on my list, I have already learned a lot from both working with Rob and in working toward implementing the optimization solution. Even though we've only been working on this for a few days, and have had only 1 pairing session to this point, I feel quite confident that both the community and I will get great benefit from these projects.

In my next post, I'll discuss what these projects are, and how we plan on implementing them.

Tags: , , , | Categories: Development Posted by bsstahl on 10/7/2006 2:42 PM | Comments (0)

Mark Michaelis posted a hitlist of things to do to convert from nUnit to VSTS tests in his article Converting a class library to a VSTS Test Project. A big part of this process is understanding the attribute translation:


nUnitVSTS
[TestFixture] [TestClass]
[TestFixtureSetUp] [ClassInitialize]
[TestFixtureTearDown] [ClassCleanup]
[SetUp] [TestInitialize]
[TearDown] [TestCleanup]
[Test] [TestMethod]